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žB.S. in International Business

žžB.A. in International Relations and Diplomacy

žB.S. in International Economics

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žMaster in Business Administration (MBA)

MBA in International Business

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žžMaster in International Relations and Diplomacy

žMaster in International Management

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You can find more information including list of courses and short description regarding each program under tab PROGRAMS at the top of this page

Schiller Welcomes Ambassador Zlatko Bars-Dimitroff

At Schiller, we always seek to ensure that our **International Relations and Diplomacy** program combines the academic depth of a graduate school with the practical policy focus of a professional school. To that end, we continuously look for faculty with both academic and practical experience in their disciplines. Accordingly, we are proud to welcome **Ambassador Zlatko Bars-Dimitroff**. A doctor of law, Ambassador Dimitroff has held multiple high-level positions in the governmental and intergovernmental sector. Taking a month’s leave to join us again at Schiller from his position as **head of a United Nations Field Office** in the Central African Republic, Dr. Dimitroff will conduct a **course on Conflict and Peace Strategies** as well as deliver open lectures on the topic for the wider community. This is the third time that Ambassador Dimtroff teaches at Schiller and an exciting opportunity for our students to learn first hand from a seasoned professional actively working in the discipline he teaches.

Elise Montchanin

Alumna Elise Montchanin Interview: Reflections on an International Career

Elise Montchanin graduated from Schiller Paris with a Bachelor of Arts in International Relations and Diplomacy

SIU: Could you tell us a little bit about your current position?
EM: I am currently the Regional Security Adviser for IDLO, the International Development Law Organization (headquartered in Rome). I am in charge of the various countries in Africa where IDLO operates, mainly Somalia, Kenya, South Sudan, Mali with Tanzania and Liberia coming up soon. I have been working for IDLO since April 2014 ensuring the safety and security of staff implementing IDLO’s programs.

SIU: What have been some of your professional accomplishments since you graduated from Schiller International University?
EM: After Schiller I joined the French army, specifically the Gendarmerie, which had always been a dream. I spent 18 years in the army, I did missions for the Department of Peacekeeping Operation (DPKO) for 6 years and was deployed in Kosovo, Haiti and Chad. I also worked 3 years for the World Food Program (WFP) as a security officer training all WFP staff in Africa.

SIU: How did the Bachelor of Arts in International Relations and Diplomacy at SIU prepare you for your career?
EM: After I graduated from Schiller I joined the French army, as mentioned, staying more than 18 years. I was quiet an atypical member of the army since I was the only one in my units to have a university degree. Having this educational background enabled me to be selected as one of the first female Gendarmes to be deployed overseas for DPKO and work for the United Nations for about 9 years in various countries. A Bachelor of Arts degree, with work experience, or a Master’s degree is now considered one of the main requirements in order to apply for international security jobs. My BA in International Relations and Diplomacy and my English proficiency have always been assets both when I was in the army and in the world of international development: it has helped me succeed at the international level.

Save the Date: Dinner-conference with the Ambassador of Sweden

Schiller Paris will be sending a delegation of students to a dinner-conference with S.E.Mme Veronika Wand-Danielsson, Ambassador of Sweden to France, who will be giving a talk on “Brexit and the European Union from the Swedish perspective”. The dinner takes place Tuesday, September 20 at the Restaurant of the Senate. Organized by the think tank, IRCE, attendees at the dinner-conference will include members of the French Senate, business leaders, journalists and policy-makers from European institutions. For Schiller Paris’s contingent of Swedish students, the event promises to be memorable in more ways than one! Other students in attendance will have a front row seat to hear top diplomatic voices give their take on the most important political development in Europe in recent memory, the exit of the UK from the European Union.

Paris internship as a first step in diplomacy

Many students take time off from the studies to work in internships at international organizations, companies, diplomatic representations and other institutions in and around Paris. Thanks to the monthly system at Schiller International University, students can work as interns any time of the year. We recently sat down with Yago Feria Sanchez a fourth-year student in the Bachelors of Arts in International Relations and Diplomacy program at Schiller Paris who is beginning an internship this August. SIU: What are you doing for the next few months? YFS: I am currently interning for the Spanish Consulate General in Paris. SIU:Why did you apply for this internship? One of my biggest interests within the field of IR has always been diplomacy, and one of its most evident forms are countries’ Permanent Representations abroad. By this I mean Embassies, Consulates, Commercial Offices, Permanent Representations at International Institutions, etc. I still haven’t chosen what career path I want to follow after I graduate, but the option of being a Diplomat is one of the ones that thrills me the most. In my country, Spain, you need to pass a public exam to become a member of the Diplomatic Corps. It requires a huge amount of time and money invested, and nobody is guaranteed that they will pass it. Normally, young diplomats are first sent to Consulates to get some experience. They are changed from one country to another after a couple of years. If they prove themselves fit for the job, they then go into Embassies. Only a minority of highly-performing ones might, one day, be appointed as Ambassadors or Consuls after a 20 or 30 year career. Since Consulates are normally the starting point, I thought I could not consider this option seriously if I didn’t first experience the day-to-day routine of a Consulate from the inside. As you know, Consulates are much less flashier than Embassies. In short, they are in charge of helping citizens of its country who need help when they are abroad, as well as foreigners in need of visas or other types of documents. To put it another way, you can’t pretend to be a general if you have never fought in the trenches. SIU: What will be your duties? YFS: I am currently being trained at the Documentation Service, although I am expected to rotate to another Service in a week. At Documentation we are in charge of issuing Passports, Safe-Passages, Residency Certificates and Inscriptions into the Consular Census. It is a rather administrative position, but it requires a lot of discipline, organization and tons of patience! Also, one needs to be able know how to pace oneself, since the workload is always huge! SIU: How do you think your Bachelors in International Relations & Diplomacy at Schiller Paris helps you? YFS: One good thing I have learned during my 3 years at Schiller is to try and look at the world with a global perspective. We never go into too much depth, but we do get a good glimpse of differences across the world. This learning process does not only stop at the classroom, since the fact of having to spend time with people coming from different corners of the planet trains you to thrive in a multicultural environment, while you embrace differences and are aware of your own cultural specificities. SIU: What advice do you have for young people interested in getting an internship at an embassy? YFS: When speaking of jobs at Consulates or Embassies, most of the times you must go through a country’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Foreign Office or its equivalent. I would say that the most straightforward way to get inside is to contact your country’s representation wherever you find yourself or to contact a foreign delegation’s representation if you are back in your home country. Your nationality there will be valued, and since most Schiller students are fluent in English and even one, two or even more other languages, you will always have an interesting profile for this type of institution. Also, remember to plan way in advance, since you must always keep within the application deadlines and there are always lots of other applicants for the same position. Thanks alot, Yago! And good luck!